Green Tea Suppositories

Written by Kathy Lynch, PharmD – Women’s International Pharmacy

 

 

The American Cancer Society estimates that 12,360 new cases of invasive cervical cancer and 4,020 deaths will be reported for 2014. Cervical cancer was a common cause of cancer death in America for years, but the death rate has drastically declined due to widespread use of the Pap test. Now, cervical dysplasia, a pattern of abnormal cervical cell growth, is far more likely to be diagnosed.

Pharmacist holding a mortar and pestleGreen tea extracts may be attractive alternative options to treating these precancerous cells. Green tea is a powerful antioxidant with antiviral, anti-tumor properties. Dosage forms include ointments, capsules, suppositories and even dietary tea.

A systematic review of three studies found that Polyphenon E ointment, a plant extract derived from green tea leaves, is both effective and safe in the treatment of external genital warts, a common cause of cervical dysplasia. Another study found that green tea extracts, in ointment and capsule form, were effective in treating cervical lesions. A dietary study in China found that drinking more green tea, along with eating more fresh vegetables, reduced the risk of developing cervical cancer.

Veregen, a water extract of green tea, has been approved by the FDA for the external treatment of genital warts. Talk to your compounder if you are interested in knowing more about green tea suppositories.

Additional Resources:
  • American Cancer Society. https://www.cancer.org.
  • Tzellos TG, et al. Efficacy, safety and tolerability of green tea catechins in the treatment of external anogenital warts: a systematic review and meta-analysis. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2011 Mar;25(3):345-53. doi: 10.1111/j.1468-3083.2010.03796.x.
  • Ahn WS, et al. Protective effects of green tea extracts (polyphenon E and EGCG) on human cervical lesions. Eur J Cancer Prev. 2003 Oct;12(5): 383-390.
  • Jia Y, et al. Case-control study of diet in patients with cervical cancer or precancerosis in Wufeng, a high incidence region in China. Asian Pac J Cancer Prev. 2012;13(10):5299-5302.
2017-12-08T15:44:23+00:00