The Lyme Disease Merry-Go-Round: Hormones, the Immune System, and Yeast

Written by Kathy Lynch, PharmD – Women’s International Pharmacy


Patients with chronic Lyme disease have weakened immune systems which may allow intestinal yeast to overgrow. Antibiotics, the mainstay of Lyme disease therapy, destroy the beneficial gut bacteria which keep yeast overgrowth in check. Yeast, in turn, depresses the immune system even further. It also binds up estrogen, making it unavailable to the cells that need it the most. Thus patients with Lyme disease may get sicker and sicker due to a compromised immune system, hormone imbalance, and yeast overgrowth.

A low sugar, low carbohydrate diet can kill off yeast while strengthening the immune system. Acidophilus and other anti-yeast supplements like aged garlic extract can help as well. (See our A Connection with Yeast newsletter.) Practitioners who treat yeast with immunotherapy can be found at the American Academy of Environmental Medicine website.

Marlene Kunold, a German practitioner who specializes in the treatment of Lyme disease, believes that healing may be incomplete until the adrenal and thyroid glands are adequately supported. Researchers have found that the adrenal glands have a positive effect on immunity. And natural killer cells, part of the immune system’s first line of defense, are more active when thyroid function is optimal.

Dr. William Hrushesky believes that estrogen dominance can decrease the activity of natural killer cells and other immune system components. Low estrogen levels can do the same thing. Progesterone can help offset estrogen dominance but may cause yeast overgrowth in susceptible individuals. It is important that patients with Lyme disease have access to medical professionals with knowledge of hormones, the immune system, and yeast.